R.I.P. Share and discuss the many routes and paths in the mountains, along the coast, and on the plains of Sfakia. Post your walk description, add photos, and discuss safety. Use information at your own risk.

jan
Posts: 32
Joined: 11 Nov 2015, 17:42

Re: R.I.P.

by jan » 15 Nov 2016, 09:55

rambler wrote:The answer to the rough Sfakian terrain is to take a pair of old non-waterproof boots that are no-good in our damp british climate & leave them behind in sunny Sfakia- in a waste bin of course!! I still have about 5 pairs left to sacrifice to Sfakia!
Dave


I operate in reverse. Two or three years of Sfakian rock then relegate the boots to the allotment at home when the tread has gone but the uppers are generally still OK.

mike
Posts: 82
Joined: 19 Nov 2015, 13:28

Re: R.I.P.

by mike » 15 Nov 2016, 10:08

Michael wrote:But how you managed to walk 15 years with the same boots will remain a mystery to me.


I thought it was the boots, but perhaps that is too simple an answer.

I waxed them regularly, before and after each trip, which might have helped keep the leather supple and less prone to wear. In this, I was following manufacturers' recommendations.

The only other factor that I can think of is the way I walk. I'm not conscious of doing anything that reduces wear on my boots, but who knows? More research is required.

tours
Posts: 2
Joined: 16 Nov 2016, 07:18

Re: R.I.P.

by tours » 08 Jul 2017, 16:28

Hello Mike.

How are your Meindl boots? Could you try them in Sfakia? Are they still alive? They should be in the age of 8 month which is "old" for Meindl boots as far as I experienced (special if you used to walk a lot in Sfakia!)

My Meindl experience:
2 x Bernina 2
1 x Guffert GTX

in 13(!) month! (A lot hiking in Crete/Sfakia and light terrain in Germany as well)
All pairs faced the same problems! Quality is really not good! My complains to Meindl support pointed almost no results. Meindl support as bad as the quality of the boots.
Funny to me: April/Mai 2017 while walking from Roumeli to Sfakia I found a single Meindl boot (almost new inside) with a damaged sole! It was between the forest of Pavlos and Marmara almost in the middle of the long and treeless part...... This was no fun to the "owner"! He left it at the E4 Pole, maybe as a sign oft dissapointment and anger!

End of 2016 I needed a new pair (again!) so I tried Hanwag Tatra Wide. And these boots are amazing! After almost 11 weeks hiking in Crete and a lot km walking in Germany they look better and they are in much better condition than the Meindl after a week! I am so happy about these boots. Very good quality and very good feeling, even after many hours of hiking.

I know many people have very good experiences with Meindl. But in my mind this is regarding the "old" Meindl production series.... Maybe you are lucky with your new pair? :)

Best regards,
Andreas

simon-1978
Posts: 17
Joined: 16 Nov 2015, 06:47

Re: R.I.P.

by simon-1978 » 07 Aug 2017, 15:24

Hi Andreas,
I have the same experiences with Meindl shoes and - stunningly - have also bought Hanwag Tratra Wide in early September 2016. Now - after one week in the Alps last September, 12 days in Crete in spring and 6 weeks in the Pyrenees - I have sent them back to Hanwag. The sole started to come off the shoes after the first two weeks in the Pyrenees. Great - as I had to buy glue (which solved the problem) and a second pair of shoes (just in case). The profile of the sole has now vanished. And: The Lowa shoes of my friend now look even worse than my Hanwags and are also on their way back to Lowa (bought in April and used for less than 6 weeks). No comment on the quality of the three leading German shoe manucfacturers....
Best wishes
Simon

tours
Posts: 2
Joined: 16 Nov 2016, 07:18

Re: R.I.P.

by tours » 08 Aug 2017, 05:30

Hi Simon,
so far I am still happy with my Hanwag! Can't confirm your experiences yet, but now I will "keep an eye" on the sole and buy some glue in advance...just in case..:-)
I am a heavy guy, usually carrying a heavy backpack. Therefor I know, my shoes suffering a lot. But still! The Hanwag are in good condition!

I'm looking forward to Mike's feedback about his"new" Meindl.

Simon, will you spend some time in Crete this year?

Best wishes,
Andreas

simon-1978
Posts: 17
Joined: 16 Nov 2015, 06:47

Re: R.I.P.

by simon-1978 » 08 Aug 2017, 06:49

Hi Andreas,
yes, have a look if the soles starts coming off on the side. You will notice this quite soon - it is obvious.... ;-)
No, at the moment, I do not plan another holidays this year, having just returned from 6 weeks on the HRP in the Pyrenees...
Best wishes
Simon

Joan
Posts: 1
Joined: 29 Nov 2015, 10:27

Re: R.I.P.

by Joan » 09 Aug 2017, 07:35

Interesting discussion!

I've just replaced my 10-year-old Meindl shoes - not boots, as my ankles won't tolerate boots any more - by the latest version, which look and feel remarkably similar to the originals. They feel like gloves - so comfortable.

The old ones have been very well used in Crete and the UK (most recently on the Pennine Way), and I've only given up on them because the soles are now too thin for stony Cretan walks. They will make excellent gardening shoes!

Joan

mike
Posts: 82
Joined: 19 Nov 2015, 13:28

Re: R.I.P.

by mike » 09 Aug 2017, 11:30

tours wrote:I know many people have very good experiences with Meindl. But in my mind this is regarding the "old" Meindl production series.... Maybe you are lucky with your new pair? :)


I'm not sure I understand your comments. I posted photos as well as some background on the type of boot and purchase that answers your questions. I am not discussing "Meindl" in the abstract, but a specific boot (Ortler) with a specific construction (one piece leather toe, double stitching, etc etc). I had to order specifically from factory because the leather boots I wanted were not sold in stores in The Netherlands. More common now are boots made with many pieces of artificial fabrics, both stitched and glued together. There are no glued seams on the Ortler that are weak points for failure. I do not think luck was involved. The soles are sufficiently stiff that there is almost no bend. I am walking on platforms, which is good for rough uneven terrain because they are very stable. This also has an effect on how I walk because the lack of flexibility means that I have to lift my feet, rather than bend at toe. I sort of walk flat-footed, bending at knee. All this means less wear and tear on the boot itself.

Add to this story the fact that hiking footwear is typically graded. Soles differ in their profile, their flexibility, the durability of the material. Soft flexible soles are OK for city walking. Upgrade for boots/shoes that are OK for well-defined trails .. less flexible, more durable, more support. Upgrade again for off-trail and rough terrain, with even stiffer soles, more profile, ankle support. Someone picks a grade too low for the Lefka Ori (or any hard limestone terrain) and the boots will be shredded in no time.

The new boots also 'fit like a glove'. I didn't need to break them in at all. This may have more to do with my own anatomy, and possibly my walking posture. I have almost never had problems with footwear, as long as they fit .. be it hiking boots of different grades, ski boots, whatever. I'm surprised by this, because my feet are wider than average, and I'd have expected some difficulties with footwear being too tight at the width. This sometimes is the case with shoes, but has never happened with ski/hiking boots.

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